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  • An introduction to financial accounting; generally accepted accounting principles and concepts; corporate financial statements; detailed discussion of current and noncurrent assets and liabilities, stockholders’ equity.
  • An introduction to the role that accounting plays in assisting management in planning, evaluating performance and decision making. Topics include cost-volume-profit analysis, cost behavior, cost estimation, relevant costs for decision making, operational budgeting and performance evaluation techniques.

  • Overview of the historical and technological development of film and its relationship to society. Introduction to film theory and criticism, including formal aspects of cinema, tools for stylistic analysis and ideological implications of film.

  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making.  Major areas covered include risk profiles, single and multi-criteria decision-making, and forecasting.  Cases are used to apply quantitative techniques.  Decision theory is used as a foundation for this class.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Develop a general understanding of the management science/operations research approach
    • Demonstrate how to describe a problem situation in terms of decisions to be made
    • Demonstrate how to develop forecasting models to predict future aspects of business operations

     

  • This course is a survey course intended to introduce students to the rich variety of topics in the field of psychology. Important themes in the course will include understanding psychology as a science and understanding the kinds of questions that psychologists ask, including, but not limited to: What is the role of the brain in behavior? How do we sense and perceive our world? How do we learn and remember things? What are psychological disorders and how do we treat them? What happens during child development? And how does our behavior change in a social context? This course fulfills the general education requirement in social science.

     

  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making.  Major areas covered include risk profiles, single and multi-criteria decision-making, and forecasting.  Cases are used to apply quantitative techniques.  Decision theory is used as a foundation for this class.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Develop a general understanding of the management science/operations research approach
    • Demonstrate how to describe a problem situation in terms of decisions to be made
    • Demonstrate how to develop forecasting models to predict future aspects of business operations
  • This course focuses on the economic relationships among nations and the implications of such relationships for domestic economic activity and policies. It covers international trade theories, balance of payments, protectionism, foreign exchange, and the role of international institutions and international arrangements such as the International Monetary Fund, economic unions, and cartels. Prerequisites: ECO 222. This class meets the Global requirement.

  • An introduction to the principles of financial management. The course emphasizes the three major components of the financial manager’s function: financial planning and control, management of working capital, and long term financial opportunities. Prerequisites: ACC 121 and BUS 219.

  • History 112: The United States as an emergent world power and the major political, economic, and social forces in the domestic experience to the present.

  • This course examines theoretical and policy issues in economic growth and development with emphasis on specific country policies and experience; alternative development paths; problems of development planning; policies for achieving growth and development in emerging countries; and conditions necessary for continued growth in advanced countries.
  • Study of accounting as related to problems of making business decisions.  Topics include cost behavior, full cost, ABC costing, product costing, short-term decision-making, budgeting, strategic planning and control.   

  • The study of systems development life cycle from initial problem analysis to systems maintenance, with particular attention to the analysis of existing system, analysis and design of replacement systems, cost analysis of the components, including software development, and the implementation of new systems. Students will participate in group projects involving the study of existing computer-based systems and develop proposals to modernize those systems. Prerequisites: Undergraduate Management or Marketing and graduate standing.

  • This course examines ethical issues involved in medicine and biotechnology.

  • Examines the conceptions of moral community and responsibility implicit in capitalism.

  • This course is an introduction to the development of an appreciation of art. Special emphasis is placed on methods, techniques, and terminology that relate to art as well as artists, cultures, and art movements throughout history.

  • This course explores the popular culture of the United States from the colonial period through the present. Popular Culture is an important reflection of the larger social, political and economic changes occurring in our nation. Through a combination of reading, writing, online discussion, and a variety of popular culture mediums, we will analyze the relationship between American popular culture and America’s past.

  • A comprehensive overview to the human services field and professional issues. The course reviews the historical roots of the human services system in the United States, explores the complex political dimensions of providing services, summarizes current social policy and the laws regulating human services, and surveys the range of services currently available through human services agencies. It also provides introduction to current professional issues in the organization, funding, and delivery of human services.

  • This course provides an understanding of group dynamics, group processes, and the roles of group members. The theories, principles, and techniques of group intervention will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the development and successful facilitation of groups in a counseling setting. The unique ethical considerations of group work will also be explored.

  • Students in this course will examine theories of career development and occupational choices. Areas to be included are lifestyle development and the changing social structures. Students will be asked to apply career development models to themselves as well as others.

  • The course provides a comprehensive overview of the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. The course explores the key points of the major theoretical approaches, as well as the strengths and limitations of each, therapeutic techniques and procedures, and the background of the theorist responsible for the theory. The counselor as a person and the counselor’s role in the professional relationship, as well as counseling ethics will also be discussed. Students will explore their own backgrounds, values, personality styles and begin the process of developing a personal counseling style.
  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of Budget, Finance & Grant Writing to build future leaders of the non-profit organizations. This course provides an understanding of the mission, vision and underlying pressure involved with non-profit financial planning and accounting. Finance/Budget Topics to be covered include budgeting, revenue sources, revenue projections, auditing, budget analysis, policy and procedures and the impact of technology in the non-profits.
    This course will also focus on the grant-writing basic elements: identifying their individual or organizational needs; understanding what kind of funding is needed; researching the appropriate sources and making sense of grant applications. It will also provide an understanding of the basic elements required for most grant proposals: cover letters, cover forms, abstracts/executive summaries; table of content; and narratives incorporating problem statements, purpose statements, goals and objectives, and budgets.

  • This course is the study of the role of corporate investment and financing decisions in creating
    competitive advantage. The course begins with strategy and capital budgeting: next examines
    how managers may corporate investment decisions; then proceeds to risk management, and
    ends with the estimation of a firms cost of capital Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial
    Accounting, Managerial Accounting and graduate standing.

  • Operations Management and Strategy offers conceptual foundations of the operations of all types of organizations and the application of analytical and quantitative techniques used to assure organizational effectiveness and efficiency.  It discusses some valuable techniques such as how to measure productivity, how to be competitive in global operations, how to use PERT and CPM in scheduling, how to forecast, how to manage quality using statistical process control, how to develop strategies for supply-chain management, warehousing, just-in-time, and how to use linear programming and waiting-line models.

  • This course explores topics and problems of current interest with particular attention to social responsibility and business ethics. We will consider a range of controversial national and global issues affecting business firms and managers. Our focus will be on exploring and assessing alternative points of view as well as articulating and supporting one’s own perspective.  Prerequisite: Marketing or Management coursework and graduate standing. 

  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making The course will provide students with an understanding of various quantitative approaches to understand the data and statistical techniques towards problem solving and decision making. Emphasis is placed on how to interpret the results of simple inferential statistics such as confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, including tests for differences between two populations. Also, this course is designed to use the concept of mathematical modeling to be able to understand and interpret the results of
    regression models. Finally, at the end of this course students will have an appreciation of the difficulties inherent in time series data and simple forecasting techniques.
    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
    • Develop a general understanding of quantitative data and how it can be analyzed
    • Demonstrate how to use statistical methods to draw conclusions about data
    • Demonstrate how to use quantitative models to interpret data and make decisions

  • Economics for Managers is to provide students with an understanding of various  microeconomics approaches towards problem solving and decision making. The coverage includes how to interpret elasticities, how to understand the effects of price controls, how to analyze the costs of production, how much to produce and how to analyze pricing strategies based on market structures (competitive and monopoly), and to discuss the markets for the factors of production and income inequality.

  • Principles of Financial Accounting

  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of measurement and evaluation of psychological variables and individual differences. This course develops an understanding of technical aspects of test construction, administration, and interpretation.
  • This course is a treatment of fundamental principles which apply to all management, regardless of the type, size, or purpose of the enterprise. The course seeks to integrate the findings of behavioral science with traditional concepts of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling.

    Prerequisites: ACC 121, ECO 222, and 223.

  • This course is primarily concerned with micromarketing: seeing marketing from a manager’s viewpoint. The marketing concept is stressed with emphasis on strategy, planning, determining the marketing mix and behavior of target markets.
  • This course is an introduction to personal finance planning. Financial topics include: careers, time value of money, budgeting, financial statements, use and misuse of credit, purchase decisions, insurance and healthy financial planning. Investment basics including stocks, bonds, mutual funds and asset allocation are also introduced in this course.
  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of Budget, Finance & Grant Writing to build future leaders of the non-profit organizations. This course provides an understanding of the mission, vision and underlying pressure involved with non-profit financial planning and accounting. Finance/Budget Topics to be covered include budgeting, revenue sources, revenue projections, auditing, budget analysis, policy and procedures and the impact of technology in the non-profits.
    This course will also focus on the grant-writing basic elements: identifying their individual or organizational needs; understanding what kind of funding is needed; researching the appropriate sources and making sense of grant applications. It will also provide an understanding of the basic elements required for most grant proposals: cover letters, cover forms, abstracts/executive summaries; table of content; and narratives incorporating problem statements, purpose statements, goals and objectives, and budgets.

  • Students in this course will be exposed to a variety of theories and techniques used in working with families. The emphasis will be on exploring family dynamics and developing the critical thinking skills needed to work with families.

  • This course will focus on the issues involved in working with those individuals involved in substance abuse. Special attention will be paid to recognizing a variety of substances and the symptoms demonstrated by those abusing these substances.

  • This course enables students to effectively use current research in the field to make appropriate decisions by giving them a practical understanding of research designs and methodologies, data collection, and interpretation strategies. Basic statistical concepts and techniques are also included.

  • This course is a treatment of fundamental principles which apply to all management, regardless of the type, size or purpose of the enterprise. The course seeks to integrate the findings of behavioral science with traditional concepts of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling.

  • This course examines ethical issues involved in medicine and biotechnology.

  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making.  Major areas covered include risk profiles, single and multi-criteria decision-making, and forecasting.  Cases are used to apply quantitative techniques.  Decision theory is used as a foundation for this class.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Develop a general understanding of the management science/operations research approach
    • Demonstrate how to describe a problem situation in terms of decisions to be made
    • Demonstrate how to develop forecasting models to predict future aspects of business operations
  • This graduate course will focus on managerial and corporate communication and the way organizational culture influences the communication processes within business organizations.

  • This course introduces the microeconomic theory and analysis useful in managerial decision making and policy formation. It applies economic principles to the analysis of production, marketing, and financial issues and the development of general operating strategies.

  • This course accessesthe sequence of formulating, implementing and controlling business strategie. Multi-business and single business strategies are explored.
  • Examines the conceptions of moral community and responsibility implicit in capitalism.

  • This course will focus upon the development of a professional identity as a helping professional. We will cover information pertaining to the legalities of service provision and licensure, particularly as it applies to Illinois law. We will review the National Organization of Human Services (NOHS) Code of Ethics, as well as the codes of the American Psychological Association (APA), the National Academy of Social Workers (NASW), and the American Counseling Association (ACA). Legal and ethical dilemmas will be presented for study to aid students with making ethical decisions.

  • A comprehensive overview of crisis intervention. This course emphasizes the recognition of psychological crisis and the application of current crisis-intervention strategies to assure client safety, stabilization, and self-determination. Emphasis will also be placed on legal and ethical
    concerns in crisis work, professionalism, and the prevention of burnout.

  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of measurement and evaluation of psychological variables and individual differences. This course develops an understanding of technical aspects of test construction, administration, and interpretation.

  • The course teaches basic listening skills and interviewing skills – skills critical in establishing a strong therapeutic relationship. A secondary purpose of the course is to encourage students’ self-exploration that will lead to the development of the student’s own natural style of helping.

  • This course provides a comprehensive study of aviation law including regulatory statutes and Federal Aviation Regulations. Students will also be introduced to civil and criminal law as applied to aviation including such aspects as operation, contracts, insurance, liability, litigation and case law.
  • This is an introduction to the diverse forms of business communication on the management level.

  • Marketing for Managers–PBU 409 is a three credit hour class that meets once per week–8 weeks–for 3 ½ hours per session or in the “Online Version” as noted. Marketing affects every aspect of our daily life. From all the goods and services we purchase, to the stores where we shop, to the radio and TV programs we watch are all affected and are influenced by marketing. Since marketing is an essential and important aspect to business success, it is imperative that anyone considering a career in business understand its significance. This course is an overview of marketing’s role in the business environment. It is primarily concerned with the micro side of marketing-seeing marketing from a manager’s viewpoint. The marketing concept is stressed with emphasis on strategy, which means understanding the marketing mix and the behavior of target markets. There is a strong emphasis places on current events in today’s world (primarily through video discussion) that illustrate the very day to day impact that marketing strategies have in everyday life occurrences.
  • Upon completion of this course, students should be familiar with the following topics:

    •Data and data set, scales of measurements, qualitative and quantitative data, cross-sectional and
    time series data, descriptive statistics, and statistical inference
    •Summarizing quantitative data using frequency distribution, bar charts, histogram, pie charts,
    cumulative distributions, cross-tabulation, and scatter diagrams
    •Measures of location, measures of variability, measures of relative location and detecting outliers,
    exploratory data analysis, measures of association between two variables, and working with
    grouped data
    •Experiments, counting rules, assigning probabilities, events and their probabilities, basic
    relationships of probability and conditional probability
    •Random variables, discrete probability distributions, expected value and variance, binomial
    probability distribution, and Poisson probability distributions
    •Normal and exponential probability distributions
    •Simple random sampling, point estimation, introduction to sampling distributions, sampling
    distribution of x-bar, sampling distribution of p-bar, and sampling methods
    •Interval estimate of a population mean: large-sample case and small sample case, and determining sample size
    •Developing null and alternative hypotheses, type I and II errors, one-tailed and two-tailed tests about a population mean, large-sample tests about a population mean, and small-sample case tests about a population proportion
  • This course introduces the microeconomic theory and analysis useful in managerial decision making and policy formation. It applies economic principles to the analysis of production, marketing, and financial issues and the development of general operating strategies. Prerequisites: ECO 223 (Principles of Microeconomics), ECO 225 (Business Statistics) and graduate standing.

  • This course focuses on the development of strategies for business logistics and international Supply Chain Management, related to transferring goods and services across national boundaries.  The coverage includes the impact of economic globalization on supply chain strategies, the design of global logistics networks, managerial processes and systems for international production and distribution, role of ports and airports in international product movement, transportation network sustainability, and security and risk management for international logistics.  Prerequisite:  graduate standing.

  • The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of key innovation and change processes within organizations and mechanisms for effectively promoting and managing such initiatives. Emphasis is placed on examining the roles of external environmental factors, technology, structure, strategic factors, organizational culture, and entrepreneurial efforts undertaken within firms on initiatives aimed at facilitating effective innovation and change. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

  • This course will provide an overview of abnormal behavior, mental, and mood disorders. It will include diagnosis, etiology, and treatment. The focus will be on the practical applications in the work place.

  • This course will provide an understanding to the best insights of the disciplines, gain exposure to real-world applications and practices, and appreciate the dynamics and fast pace work environment in the information age and global economy. This instructional approach and materials will deliver on all of these dimensions and probably more.

  • This course covers the psychological, social, physical, and cognitive stages of human development and identifies the client’s needs in each of the stages. There is special emphasis on the role of individuals in families, relationships, and social structures on human development.

  • This course will focus on those issues which affect clients in the social services field such as ethnic diversity, poverty, subculture influences, and gender differences. Focus will also be paid to those issues found particularly in rural populations. Equivalent to SOC 300.

  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making The course will provide students with an understanding of various quantitative approaches to understand the data and statistical techniques towards problem solving and decision making. Emphasis is placed on how to interpret the results of simple inferential statistics such as confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, including tests for differences between two populations. Also, this course is designed to use the concept of mathematical modeling to be able to understand and interpret the results of
    regression models. Finally, at the end of this course students will have an appreciation of the difficulties inherent in time series data and simple forecasting techniques.
    Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
    • Develop a general understanding of quantitative data and how it can be analyzed
    • Demonstrate how to use statistical methods to draw conclusions about data
    • Demonstrate how to use quantitative models to interpret data and make decisions

  • This course is the study of the role of corporate investment and financing decisions in creating
    competitive advantage. The course begins with strategy and capital budgeting: next examines
    how managers may corporate investment decisions; then proceeds to risk management, and
    ends with the estimation of a firms cost of capital Prerequisite(s): Principles of Financial
    Accounting, Managerial Accounting and graduate standing.

  • Operations Management and Strategy offers conceptual foundations of the operations of all types of organizations and the application of analytical and quantitative techniques used to assure organizational effectiveness and efficiency.  It discusses some valuable techniques such as how to measure productivity, how to be competitive in global operations, how to use PERT and CPM in scheduling, how to forecast, how to manage quality using statistical process control, how to develop strategies for supply-chain management, warehousing, just-in-time, and how to use linear programming and waiting-line models.

  • This course explores topics and problems of current interest with particular attention to social responsibility and business ethics. We will consider a range of controversial national and global issues affecting business firms and managers. Our focus will be on exploring and assessing alternative points of view as well as articulating and supporting one’s own perspective.  Prerequisite: Marketing or Management coursework and graduate standing. 

  • Principles of Financial Accounting

  • Economics for Managers is to provide students with an understanding of various  microeconomics approaches towards problem solving and decision making. The coverage includes how to interpret elasticities, how to understand the effects of price controls, how to analyze the costs of production, how much to produce and how to analyze pricing strategies based on market structures (competitive and monopoly), and to discuss the markets for the factors of production and income inequality.

  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of measurement and evaluation of psychological variables and individual differences. This course develops an understanding of technical aspects of test construction, administration, and interpretation.
  • This course provides an understanding of group dynamics, group processes, and the roles of group members. The theories, principles, and techniques of group intervention will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the development and successful facilitation of groups in a counseling setting. The unique ethical considerations of group work will also be explored.

  • Students in this course will examine theories of career development and occupational choices. Areas to be included are lifestyle development and the changing social structures. Students will be asked to apply career development models to themselves as well as others.

  • The course provides a comprehensive overview of the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. The course explores the key points of the major theoretical approaches, as well as the strengths and limitations of each, therapeutic techniques and procedures, and the background of the theorist responsible for the theory. The counselor as a person and the counselor’s role in the professional relationship, as well as counseling ethics will also be discussed. Students will explore their own backgrounds, values, personality styles and begin the process of developing a personal counseling style.
  • A comprehensive overview to the human services field and professional issues. The course reviews the historical roots of the human services system in the United States, explores the complex political dimensions of providing services, summarizes current social policy and the laws regulating human services, and surveys the range of services currently available through human services agencies. It also provides introduction to current professional issues in the organization, funding, and delivery of human services.

  • The course provides an introduction to classic and contemporary theories of crisis communication with opportunities to apply theory to practice.  Students will analyze representative cases, identify current approaches, and develop original materials.

  • This graduate course will focus on managerial and corporate communication and the way organizational culture influences the communication processes within business organizations.

  • This course explores the popular culture of the United States from the colonial period through the present. Popular Culture is an important reflection of the larger social, political and economic changes occurring in our nation. Through a combination of reading, writing, online discussion, and a variety of popular culture mediums, we will analyze the relationship between American popular culture and America’s past.

  • This course will provide the opportunity for students to learn the skills and strategies necessary to become effective business communicators.

  • Examines the conceptions of moral community and responsibility implicit in capitalism.
  • Managerial Accounting
  • This course is a survey course intended to introduce students to the rich variety of topics in the field of psychology.

  • This course focuses on the economic relationships among nations and the implications of such relationships for domestic economic activity and policies. It covers international trade theories, balance of payments, protectionism, foreign exchange, and the role of international institutions and international arrangements such as the International Monetary Fund, economic unions, and cartels. Prerequisites: ECO 222. This class meets the Global requirement.
  • Study of accounting as related to problems of making business decisions.  Topics include cost behavior, full cost, ABC costing, product costing, short-term decision-making, budgeting, strategic planning and control.   

  • This course explains the progress that has been made in many parts of the developing world, but fully faces the enormous problems and challenges that remain to be addressed in the years ahead.  This course shows the wide diversity across the developing world, and the differing positions in the global economy held by developing countries.  The principles of development economies are keys to understanding how we got to where we are, and why many development problems are so difficult to solve; and to the design of successful economic development policy and programs as we look ahead. 

  • An In-depth study of the impact of behavioral
    psychology and sociology within organizations and upon individuals. The
    theory and applications of techniques which will enhance the manager's
    effectiveness and ability to effect change in organizations.

  • Primarily concerned with micromarketing. The marketing concept is stressed with emphasis on strategic planning, determining the marketing mix, and behavior of target markets.
    Course
  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making.  Major areas covered include risk profiles, single and multi-criteria decision-making, and forecasting.  Cases are used to apply quantitative techniques.  Decision theory is used as a foundation for this class.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Develop a general understanding of the management science/operations research approach
    • Demonstrate how to describe a problem situation in terms of decisions to be made
    • Demonstrate how to develop forecasting models to predict future aspects of business operations
  • This course uses quantitative tools as an aid in decision-making.  Major areas covered include risk profiles, single and multi-criteria decision-making, and forecasting.  Cases are used to apply quantitative techniques.  Decision theory is used as a foundation for this class.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

    • Develop a general understanding of the management science/operations research approach
    • Demonstrate how to describe a problem situation in terms of decisions to be made
    • Demonstrate how to develop forecasting models to predict future aspects of business operations

     

  • The course introduces a casuistic method for the development of in-depth analysis of ethical issues in strategic communication with application of a range of theories including deontological, utilitarian, virtue, and natural law approaches. 

  • This graduate course will focus on communication and the way research methods can be used to examine the communication processes and theories about those procresses.

  • This course is a treatment of fundamental principles which apply to all management, regardless of the type, size, or purpose of the enterprise. The course seeks to integrate the findings of behavioral science with traditional concepts of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling.

    Prerequisites: ACC 121, ECO 222, and 223.

  • History 112: The United States as an emergent world power and the major political, economic, and social forces in the domestic experience to the present.
  • An introduction to the principles of financial management. The course emphasizes the three major components of the financial manager’s function: financial planning and control, management of working capital, and long term financial opportunities. Prerequisites: ACC 121 and BUS 219.
  • Overview of the historical and technological development of film and its relationship to society. Introduction to film theory and criticism, including formal aspects of cinema, tools for stylistic analysis and ideological implications of film.
  • This course acquaints students with microorganisms and their attributes. Topics include microbial cell structure and function, metabolism, growth, the role of microorganisms in disease, immunity, and other selected areas. The laboratory will stress aseptic technique, culturing methods, proper use of the microscope, staining techniques, control of microbial growth, and unknown identification.

  • Principles of Financial Accounting
  • The study of systems development life cycle from initial problem analysis to systems maintenance, with particular attention to the analysis of existing system, analysis and design of replacement systems, cost analysis of the components, including software development, and the implementation of new systems. Students will participate in group projects involving the study of existing computer-based systems and develop proposals to modernize those systems. Prerequisites: Undergraduate Management or Marketing and graduate standing.

  • Students in this course will be exposed to a variety of theories and techniques used in working with families. The emphasis will be on exploring family dynamics and developing the critical thinking skills needed to work with families.
  • This course will focus on the issues involved in working with those individuals involved in substance abuse. Special attention will be paid to recognizing a variety of substances and the symptoms demonstrated by those abusing these substances.
  • This course enables students to effectively use current research in the field to make appropriate decisions by giving them a practical understanding of research designs and methodologies, data collection, and interpretation strategies. Basic statistical concepts and techniques are also included.
  • This course introduces the microeconomic theory and analysis useful in managerial decision making and policy formation. It applies economic principles to the analysis of production, marketing, and financial issues and the development of general operating strategies. Prerequisites: ECO 222 (Principles ofMacroeconomics), ECO 223 (Principles of Microeconomics), ECO 225 (Business Statistics) and graduate
    standing.
  • This graduate course will focus on managerial and corporate communication and the way organizational culture influences the communication processes within business organizations.
  • This course introduces the concepts and strategies related to supply chain management. It discusses several aspects of supply chain management including drivers, planning and forecasting, uncertainty, transportation concerns, information technology, and sustainability.
  • The purpose of the course is to provide an understanding of customers in the marketplace and the constant dynamics of market change.

    Prerequisite: graduate standing.
  • Examines the conceptions of moral community and responsibility implicit in capitalism.
  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of Budget, Finance & Grant Writing to build future leaders of the non-profit organizations. This course provides an understanding of the mission, vision and underlying pressure involved with non-profit financial planning and accounting. Finance/Budget Topics to be covered include budgeting, revenue sources, revenue projections, auditing, budget analysis, policy and procedures and the impact of technology in the non-profits.
    This course will also focus on the grant-writing basic elements: identifying their individual or organizational needs; understanding what kind of funding is needed; researching the appropriate sources and making sense of grant applications. It will also provide an understanding of the basic elements required for most grant proposals: cover letters, cover forms, abstracts/executive summaries; table of content; and narratives incorporating problem statements, purpose statements, goals and objectives, and budgets.
  • A comprehensive overview of crisis intervention. This course emphasizes the recognition of psychological crisis and the application of current crisis-intervention strategies to assure client safety, stabilization, and self-determination. Emphasis will also be placed on legal and ethical
    concerns in crisis work, professionalism, and the prevention of burnout.
  • This course will focus upon the development of a professional identity as a helping professional. We will cover information pertaining to the legalities of service provision and licensure, particularly as it applies to Illinois law. We will review the National Organization of Human Services (NOHS) Code of Ethics, as well as the codes of the American Psychological Association (APA), the National Academy of Social Workers (NASW), and the American Counseling Association (ACA). Legal and ethical dilemmas will be presented for study to aid students with making ethical decisions.

  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of measurement and evaluation of psychological variables and individual differences. This course develops an understanding of technical aspects of test construction, administration, and interpretation.
  • The course teaches basic listening skills and interviewing skills – skills critical in establishing a strong therapeutic relationship. A secondary purpose of the course is to encourage students’ self-exploration that will lead to the development of the student’s own natural style of helping.

  • This course will provide an overview of abnormal behavior, mental, and mood disorders. It will include diagnosis, etiology, and treatment. The focus will be on the practical applications in the work place.
  • This course will focus on those issues which affect clients in the social services field such as ethnic diversity, poverty, subculture influences, and gender differences. Focus will also be paid to those issues found particularly in rural populations. Equivalent to SOC 300.
  • This course will provide an understanding to the best insights of the disciplines, gain exposure to real-world applications and practices, and appreciate the dynamics and fast pace work environment in the information age and global economy. This instructional approach and materials will deliver on all of these dimensions and probably more.
  • This course covers the psychological, social, physical, and cognitive stages of human development and identifies the client’s needs in each of the stages. There is special emphasis on the role of individuals in families, relationships, and social structures on human development.
  • This course focuses on the theory and principles of measurement and evaluation of psychological variables and individual differences. This course develops an understanding of technical aspects of test construction, administration, and interpretation.
  • Students in this course will examine theories of career development and occupational choices. Areas to be included are lifestyle development and the changing social structures. Students will be asked to apply career development models to themselves as well as others.
  • This course provides an understanding of group dynamics, group processes, and the roles of group members. The theories, principles, and techniques of group intervention will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the development and successful facilitation of groups in a counseling setting. The unique ethical considerations of group work will also be explored.
  • The course provides a comprehensive overview of the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. The course explores the key points of the major theoretical approaches, as well as the strengths and limitations of each, therapeutic techniques and procedures, and the background of the theorist responsible for the theory. The counselor as a person and the counselor’s role in the professional relationship, as well as counseling ethics will also be discussed. Students will explore their own backgrounds, values, personality styles and begin the process of developing a personal counseling style.
  • A comprehensive overview to the human services field and professional issues. The course reviews the historical roots of the human services system in the United States, explores the complex political dimensions of providing services, summarizes current social policy and the laws regulating human services, and surveys the range of services currently available through human services agencies. It also provides introduction to current professional issues in the organization, funding, and delivery of human services.
  • Historical and literary developments of the New Testament with analysis of its major Christian themes. Students will synthetically study the four Gospel records, emphasizing the events of Jesus’ ministry with a view to fuller understanding of the significance of his words and deeds. Students will then study the thirteen Pauline and eight Catholic Epistles, focusing on comprehension and application of their doctrinal and ethical teachings.

  • This course will provide the opportunity for students to learn the skills and strategies necessary to become effective business communicators. This course counts toward a minor in writing but does not fulfill the general education requirement in literature or count toward the English major. Prerequisites: ENG 111 & 112. (Same as ENG 382)
  • An introduction to College Algebra including online activities and weekly classroom participation.
  • Phil 227 is devoted to the philosophy of punishment. What is the philosophy of punishment? Think of it this way: virtually every society that has ever existed imposes rules on the people who live in it. If you break those rules, something bad will happen to you. That's punishment. But the funny thing about punishment that makes it worth examining in a critical way is that it typically involves things being done to rule-breakers that would be quite wrong in a different context.

  • An In-depth study of the impact of behavioral
    psychology and sociology within organizations and upon individuals. The
    theory and applications of techniques which will enhance the manager's
    effectiveness and ability to effect change in organizations.

  • The study of systems development life cycle from initial problem analysis to systems maintenance, with particular attention to the analysis of existing system, analysis and design of replacement systems, cost analysis of the components, including software development, and the implementation of new systems. Students will participate in group projects involving the study of existing computer-based systems and develop proposals to modernize those systems. Prerequisites: Undergraduate Management or Marketing and graduate standing.